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Ns were transferred to nitrocellulose and these membranes were incubated with primary antibody for 60 minutes (anti-Gal1 from Research Diagnostics, Flanders, New Jersey, anti-beta actin from Sigma, St. Louis, Missouri). After washing and incubation with secondary antibody (Goat Anti-Mse IgG-HRP, Pierce, Rockford, IL), developing solution was added to the membrane (Supersignal West Femto Substrate,
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Ed clones were compared to their GFP control counterparts. (Westerns controlled for loading by -actin IB). (D) Over-expression of galectin-1 promotes invasion. All cell counts were normalized to the parental cell line data. (Westerns controlled for loading by -actin IB).our identification of galectin-1 as a mediator of glioma invasion has been corroborated previously as detailed below. While previ
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Ble cross-hybridizing host genes. The use of our animal model to identify mediators of glioma invasion has the potential pitfall of identifying artifacts of xenografting. That is, human glioma cells confronted with nude mouse brain rather than human brain may express genes specific to this setting. Two arguments can be made against this theory. First, there is no teleological reason for human cell
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Ble cross-hybridizing host genes. The use of our animal model to identify mediators of glioma invasion has the potential pitfall of identifying artifacts of xenografting. That is, human glioma cells confronted with nude mouse brain rather than human brain may express genes specific to this setting. Two arguments can be made against this theory. First, there is no teleological reason for human cell
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Cal significance.Paraffin sections of our patient-derived glioblastoma xenografts (15 of 22 lines) were stained for galectin-1 expression. Around half of the xenografts tested showed preferential staining at the tumor-brain interface (Figure 3). A few tumors stained in their entirety, and another subset lacked significant staining. The 2 to 4 fold change in galectin-1 mRNA expression at the tumor
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Assays of GBM cells stably transfected to over-express galectin-1, perfectly fit in with the previous studies mentioned above and highlight the importance of galectin-1 in the biologically aggressive behavior of experimental GBMs. While there was no enhancement of proliferation or change inattachment to fibronectin, galectin-1 upregulation induced more rapid two-dimensional migration and enhanced
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Action of the tumor [22,36]. Indeed, abrogating galectin-1 expression renders tumor cells more susceptible to temozolamide treatment [22,41]. Finally, galectin-1 induces apoptosis of activated T-cells [42-46], prevents host animals from mounting tumor vaccine-induced immunity [47], and may cooperate with TGF-beta in GBM-induced immunosuppression [48,49]. In sum, galectin-1 expression may inversely
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Or his help with radial migration assays. Reagents used in preliminary pilot assays were kindly provided by Yoel Kloog Authors' contributions LGT and JHU conceived of the study and designed the assays. LGT performed tumor xenografting, cell culture, and laser capture microdissection. LGT, FL, and RK wrote and edited the manuscript. AN designed and performed all DNA vector construction and sequenci